New Lantra Health & Safety Courses

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Health and Safety  Courses – All new Lantra Awards  Courses launched on 01 March 2016.

Lantra Awards  have  launched and updated a range of Health and Safety  Courses

covering Construction, Fencing, Agriculture & Horticulture and Forestry.  These  courses include  Safety Awareness, Risk Assessment and Heights is scope to  customise these to suit  businesses with  differing requirements.

To emphasise the  value of these   courses we  were  sad to read of the  outcome of an accident with a  forklift HERE . Safety  belts are fitted to  machines with  good reason.

For  further   information about Health & Safety  Courses or other  training courses please contact us  HERE

Health and Safety  Courses

 

Iñlmnoinkbfj pbphoicicZ pbx cl lIt’s Christmas !

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Well, it isn’t quite Christmas but that is the wake up call to plan your Autumn and Winter training!

tractor-trackedonions waiting for harvestHaving completed our busiest summer training season ever, with a short gasp of breath we are off into the Autumn and Winter season again. Where does  time go?  With several  new  courses and new instructors  things seem to be  heading forward.

So  far  demand for  Pesticide  training has  been up, spurred on by the  ending of “grandfather rights”.  We are  offering new  courses on Agricultural  Vehicles  on the Road and the Law,  Agricultural Trailer  Braking Systems, updated  refresher   training for Forklift and Telehandlers and again we are  preparing to hold another Safe Use of  Aluminium Phosphide   course.

Need to  discuss your requirements.  Just  click on the button, send us a message and we  will be  back as soon as we  can. Contact Us

 

Driver CPC

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We are pleased  to confirm that  we  have  a number of  courses which are  registered for Driver CPC from 9th September 2014

drivercpd2

Click HERE for  more information

Different days, different tractors

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Another   busy week full of contrasts.

 

Sunday and helping out at  The Fighter Collections  Flying Legends Air display.  driving a tractor Russell Smith Farms kindly   supplied to help out to   move this   39 tonne  Lockheed  Constellation.  Reversing with a difference!

connie

Monday and one of our  regulars, a great  crowd from  Rectory  Farm at Milton preparing for their  Maze spectacular.  We really en joy this  course as the  chance to sample the  food in the restaurant during  the lunchtime  break  is overwhelming!

maze

After a midweek trip to Buntingford and  then East Suffolk coast we  ended up in the tranquil area of Old Romney for  some  refresher  Forklift training on behalf of Mid Kent Training, a beautiful place which would have been even more  beautiful without a  4 hour  return drive!

kentNext week and Cambridge and Newmarket  beckon.

Latest news from HSE shows a fall in farm fatalities

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The latest results in agriculture, forestry and fishing show:

  • 29 fatal injuries to workers, the average over the previous five years was 36. Almost half as many workers were killed in 2012/13p as in 1981 (54), but the average worker fatality rate, over the last five years, is much higher than in any other industry section (RIDDOR);
  • Almost half (41%) of the workers who were fatally injured were farmers; another 17% were farm workers;
  • Seven fatal injuries to members of the public – the average over the previous five years was five;
  • Major injury rates and numbers have not changed significantly over the last three years. The proportion of injuries actually reported in agriculture is low, so it is difficult to draw any meaningful conclusions about trends.

(Source and further information:  HSE – Agriculture )

Govt. updates Working at Heights guidance

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The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has overhauled its guidance for working at height, setting out in clear, simple terms what to do and what not to do – and debunking common myths that can confuse and mislead employers.

Key changes include:

  • providing simple advice about do’s and don’ts when working at height to ensure people are clear on what the law requires
  • busting some of the persistent myths about health and safety law, such as the banning of ladders when they can still be used
  • offering targeted advice to helping business in different sectors manage serious risks sensibly and proportionately
  • helping workers to be clearer about their own responsibilities for working safely.

You should make sure that people with sufficient skills, knowledge and experience are employed to perform the task, or, if they are being trained, that they work under the supervision of somebody competent to do it.

In the case of low-risk, short duration tasks involving ladders, competence requirements may be no more than making sure employees receive instruction on how to use the equipment safely (eg how to tie a ladder properly) and appropriate training. Training often takes place on the job, it does not always take place in a classroom.

When a more technical level of competence is required, for example drawing up a plan for assembling a complex scaffold, existing training and certification schemes drawn up by trade associations and industry is one way to help demonstrate competence.

 

CATraining provide   the Lantra Awards “Working at  Heights Risk Assesment Course” we include the  updates as  launched on 28th January  by the  HSE – For  more information or to  book a  course : Contact  Us

Encouraging news from HSE

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Reduction in fatalities  for  last  year  but  no room  for  complacency in latest  report  from HSE:

“The latest results in agriculture, forestry and fishing show:

  • 29 fatal injuries to workers, the average over the previous five years was 36. Almost half as many workers were killed in 2012/13p as in 1981 (54), but the average worker fatality rate, over the last five years, is much higher than in any other industry section (RIDDOR);
  • Almost half (41%) of the workers who were fatally injured were farmers; another 17% were farm workers;
  • Seven fatal injuries to members of the public – the average over the previous five years was five;
  • Major injury rates and numbers have not changed significantly over the last three years. The proportion of injuries actually reported in agriculture is low, so it is difficult to draw any meaningful conclusions about trends.”

 

 

Cleaner Profitable Farming Event, East Suffolk

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Following on from successful  course in Cambridgeshire.

In partnership with  Natural  England  we  are  pleased to announce the  second  presentation on Cachement Sensitive Farming.  With  Leading experts in their respective fields  this is  a  not to  be  missed  event  with invaluable  information on responsible   solutions  to  pollution  control.

For  more information click HERE